Written by Standard Issue

Misc

Saturday Morning Pictures

It’s time for another trawl through history and this week we’re looking at famous Edwardian women.

Maud Allan

1. Maud Allan as Salome, 1906. The Canadian pianist turned actor, dancer and choreographer became involved in an infamous libel trial in the UK in 1918, leading to obscenity charges about her version of the Dance of the Seven Veils. Allan lost the trial and moved to the US, where she taught dance until her death in California in 1956. Reutlinger Photos

2. Maud Stevens Wagner, first known female tattoo artist in the USA, 1907. Wagner worked as an aerialist and contortionist in travelling circuses until meeting tattoo artist Gus Wagner, who she later married. The pair were among the last to use the hand-poked technique and credited with bringing tattoos to inland America. The Plaza Gallery, Los Angeles

2. Maud Stevens Wagner, first known female tattoo artist in the USA, 1907. Wagner worked as an aerialist and contortionist in travelling circuses until meeting tattoo artist Gus Wagner, who she later married. The pair were among the last to use the hand-poked technique and credited with bringing tattoos to inland America. The Plaza Gallery, Los Angeles

3. Marta Hari, 1906. Born in the Netherlands, Margaretha Geertruida MacLeod was an exotic dancer and courtesan. In 1917, she was convicted of spying for Germany and executed by firing squad in France. Via Wikimedia Commons

3. Marta Hari, 1906. Born in the Netherlands, Margaretha Geertruida MacLeod was an exotic dancer and courtesan. In 1917, she was convicted of spying for Germany and executed by firing squad in France. Via Wikimedia Commons

4. Isabel Jay in Miss Hook of Holland, 1906. An English opera star and actress who began to sing in public at the age of 12, Jay was the first winner of the Gilbert R Betjemann medal for operatic singing. Via Wikimedia Commons

4. Isabel Jay in Miss Hook of Holland, 1906. An English opera star and actress who began to sing in public at the age of 12, Jay was the first winner of the Gilbert R Betjemann medal for operatic singing. Via Wikimedia Commons

5. Sylvia Pankhurst, 1909. English campaigner for the suffragette movement. She was a prominent left-wing campaigner, who later devoted herself to the cause of anti-fascism and anti-colonialism. Via Wikimedia Commons

5. Sylvia Pankhurst, 1909. English campaigner for the suffragette movement. She was a prominent left-wing campaigner, who later devoted herself to the cause of anti-fascism and anti-colonialism. Via Wikimedia Commons

6. Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904. The first female academic on the faculty of the University of Manchester, Stopes was a British author, palaeobotanist and campaigner for eugenics and women's rights. She founded – with second husband Humphrey Verdon Roe – the first birth control clinic in Britain and wrote the then-notorious sex manual Married Love. Via Wikimedia Commons

6. Marie Stopes in her laboratory, 1904. The first female academic on the faculty of the University of Manchester, Stopes was a British author, palaeobotanist and campaigner for eugenics and women’s rights. She founded – with second husband Humphrey Verdon Roe – the first birth control clinic in Britain and wrote the then-notorious sex manual Married Love. Via Wikimedia Commons

7. Mrs Patrick Campbell, 1902. English stage actress, born Beatrice Stella Tanner. George Bernard Shaw wrote the role of Eliza Doolittle for Campbell, with whom he had a passionate but unconsummated love affair. They wrote each other a series of infamous letters, which were published after his death in 1952. George Charles Beresford

7. Mrs Patrick Campbell, 1902. English stage actress, born Beatrice Stella Tanner. George Bernard Shaw wrote the role of Eliza Doolittle for Campbell, with whom he had a passionate but unconsummated love affair. They wrote each other a series of infamous letters, which were published after his death in 1952. George Charles Beresford

8. Edith Wharton, 1905. In 1920, the American novelist, short story writer and designer became the first woman to win a Pulitzer prize. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Via Wikimedia Commons

8. Edith Wharton, 1905. In 1920, the American novelist, short story writer and designer became the first woman to win a Pulitzer prize. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Via Wikimedia Commons

9. Marie Studholme, c 1900. Bradford-born star of Victorian and Edwardian musical comedy, Studholme appeared on many popular picture postcards. Via Wikimedia Commons.

9. Marie Studholme, c 1900. Bradford-born star of Victorian and Edwardian musical comedy, Studholme appeared on many popular picture postcards. Via Wikimedia Commons

10. Suffrage Alliance Congress, London 1909. The attendees included women from Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Finland, Russia, Germany, Switzerland and the US. The UK was represented by Millicent Fawcett, pictured front row, centre. Via Wikimedia Commons

10. Suffrage Alliance Congress, London 1909. The attendees included women from Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Finland, Russia, Germany, Switzerland and the US. The UK was represented by Millicent Fawcett, pictured front row, centre. Via Wikimedia Commons

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Written by Standard Issue

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