Written by Yosra Osman

Arts

They ain’t afraid of no keyboard warriors

Yosra Osman went to see Ghostbusters. She loved it. The world still spins on its axis.

Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon. Photos: Columbia Pictures.

With a sideline in busting online whiners: Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon. Photos: Columbia Pictures.

If you think you can get over the sheer horror of four female Ghostbusters, you’re in for a fun time.

I love how it takes four women to bring the trolls out from under their dark, hateful rocks. Anyone who says sexism isn’t still prevalent in the film industry just needs to look at some of the Ghostbusters backlash.

When the first trailer for Paul Feig’s reboot was released, revealing Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones in all their Ghostbusting glory, the anger was rife. Have a look at some of the comments from certain individuals, who may or may not be lacking some brain cells:

• “Feminists ruin the world.”
• “Did this just become a chick flick?”
• “Who you gonna call…? Someone else.”
• “Pls don’t watch this feminist propaganda.”

It’s actually amusing so many are wasting their energy behind a keyboard to throw so much bile.  On YouTube, the trailer has almost a million dislikes. IMDB is being spammed with haters giving the film as low a rating as possible. It had a rating of 3.5/10 before the film was even released. It’s dumb, misogynist chaos.

And frankly, the filmmakers and cast do not give a shit.

Ghostbusters is one huge kick in the arse to all haters. Directed by Feig, and co-written with Katie Dippold, its publicity will probably only make it do better – a fact that fills me with glee – and those who go and see it are in for a good time. It’s nowhere near perfect, but it is so much fun. And  the best thing about it? The four women at its centre. Suck it, trolls.

“Kate McKinnon is the badass nerd queen we’ve always wanted: carefree and fearless, she’s having an absolute blast (literally) being an eccentric oddball, who doesn’t give a damn about what anyone else thinks.”

Wiig plays Dr Erin Gilbert, a scientist in quantum physics who is ashamed of a book on the paranormal she once wrote with one-time friend Abby Yates (McCarthy). When she discovers the book is still doing the rounds and ruining her reputation, she confronts Abby, who is now working with gadget pro Holtzmann (McKinnon). Meanwhile ghosts are starting to appear across the city, and Erin must team up with Abby, Holtzmann and subway worker Patty (Jones) to catch the creepers.

Much like in the real world, the film’s four characters face a lot of crap from their male counterparts. These men fire them, ignore them, try to arrest them… the only decent one is Chris Hemsworth, who is oddly delightful as dumb receptionist Kevin, a guy who wears his glasses without the lenses and can’t answer the phone.

Paul Feig, who directed Bridesmaids and Spy among others, is a fan of boosting funny female characters, and he doesn’t miss a trick here. Wiig and McCarthy are solid leads, and Leslie Jones commands with her great energy and punchy one-liners. Jones unfortunately has received a large part of the Ghostbusters hate, not just from the angry nerds but those who call her role of Patty the ‘token black character’, upset that Patty is not also a scientist and, as they see it, conforms to black stereotypes. I do wish she’d had more to do, but I’ll leave it to Jones, who has taken to Twitter, to respond.

Kate McKinnon
Ghostbusters’
real surprise is McKinnon, a Saturday Night Live regular who steals all the attention with her audacious, casual stare and nonchalant stance.  She’s the badass nerd queen we’ve always wanted: carefree and fearless, she’s having an absolute blast (literally) being an eccentric oddball, who doesn’t give a damn about what anyone else thinks. More roles for her, please.

The four leading ladies are far more captivating and exhilarating than the CGI effects, which are a bit overdone and detract from the fresh feel of the film. Overall the plot is a little convoluted, and the narrative of the second half in particular sits in unnatural contrast to the performances that lead it. However, there are some really nice nudges and winks towards the 1984 original, which shows an overall reverence from the filmmakers for Ivan Reitman’s classic.

Of course, the original Ghostbusters is irreplaceable; we knew this without having to hear from the screaming basement-dwellers, in fits that their childhood classic is being ‘ruined’. I’m trying to work out if any of them saw Ghostbusters 2 though, because that was definitely worse.

With slime, proton shooters, a large-scale dance sequence in the credits and fart jokes, this Ghostbusters reboot is all a bit silly, but isn’t that what Ghostbusters always was? It’s sublime fun, and I found myself laughing throughout. Thank you Mr Feig and the gang for giving us an easy, amusing ride through the slime, grime and all-out good times.

Haters gonna hate, but the rest of us know who we’re gonna call.

@yozzie_osman

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Written by Yosra Osman

Yosra Osman is a mid-twenties film fan and self-confessed daydreamer of dangerous proportions